How does having divorced parents change the wedding invitations, bride/groom speech, etc.?


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Wedding Invitations

When there are two sets of parents for the bride or groom – or both – wedding invitation wording can get a bit tricky. Have no fear though, we’ve got you covered. Find out how to type out the invites seamlessly with some of the examples below!

The Question: How does having divorced parents change the wedding invitations?

My parents are divorced, and my dad is remarried. When it comes time to word our wedding invitations, how do I do this appropriately? Is there a proper way to refer to the coupling without hurting anyone’s feelings?

Our Answer

If the parents are divorced but still hosting the wedding together, list the names on separate lines with the mother first. Exclude any connector between the two names such as “and.”

There are a lot of great examples to follow when it comes to wedding invitation wording the your specific situation, so don’t fear. Below you’ll find a couple examples that can help springboard some ideas for your own event!

Example Wording of Wedding Invitations With Divorced Parents

Divorced Parents

Here’s an example of a formal and/or traditional weddings held in a church and hosted by the divorced parents of the bride (include parents’ names on separate lines):

Ms. Elaine Robbins

Mr. Bradley Hunter

request the honor of your presence

at the marriage of their daughter

Odette Claire

to

Oliver Richards Temple

Saturday, the twenty-third of June

two thousand and twelve

at half-past four o’clock

First Church

New Vernon, New Jersey

Use Similar Wording If One Parent Has Remarried

Ms. Elaine Robbins

Mr. and Mrs. Bradley Hunter

request the honor of your presence

at the marriage of their daughter

Odette Claire

to

Oliver Richards Temple

Saturday, the twenty-third of June

two thousand and twelve

at half-past four o’clock

First Church

New Vernon, New Jersey

Bella Figura has some other great examples to follow as well.

How To Word Your Speeches

Just like your invitations, you want to be gentle with the way you word your speeches. If you plan on giving a quick “thank you” speech, you’ll want to make sure that you smooth over the separation while giving each one of your beloved parents the recognition that they deserve.

It could be as simple as:

“I’d like to thank my dad, {x} and his wife {x} for {x}. And I’d also like to give a warm thank you to my mom, {x} and her husband {x} for {x}.”

Flip some things around and personalize it in whatever you feel comfortable. The most important element here is that you give names and make your appreciation known without focusing on the separation between the two.

Other Helpful Resources